Monthly Archives: February 2015

Five Ways to Evolve Your Business Analytics Software Environment to Address the Big Data Revolution

February 17, 2015

If you’re reading this blog post, you’re probably tired of wandering into meetings where your colleagues debate the proper definition of “important” terms such as enterprise performance management (EPM), business intelligence (BI), business analytics, master data management (MDM), data scientist…and, my favorite, big data.  While confusion reigns in your working group about what these terms mean, you’re undoubtedly also experiencing requests for different kinds of analysis and reporting from people in your organization who never used to care about this stuff!  And they, too, are asking you about this elusive “big data.”

So what’s really going on here?  Think back (if you’re old enough) to the shift to the Internet; or a little further back to client server; or even earlier, to the shift from mainframe to other varieties of computing.  We’re in the middle of one of those tectonic shifts in the technology world that comes along fairly infrequently, and causes a lot of discomfort until things shake out!  And that annoying, elusive, catch-all term, “big data” is at the heart of this change.

The philosopher Aristotle once said, “He who thus considers things in their first growth and origin … will obtain the clearest view of them.” So how did the big data concept evolve?

As described in Wikipedia’s big data “Definition” description, “…analyst Doug Laney defined data growth challenges and opportunities as being three-dimensional…increasing volume (amount of data), velocity (speed of data in and out), and variety (range of data types and sources). Gartner, and now much of the industry, continues to use this “3Vs” model for describing big data. In 2012, Gartner updated its definition as follows: “Big data is high volume, high velocity, and/or high variety information assets that require new forms of processing to enable enhanced decision making, insight discovery and process optimization.”

Another big transformation is afoot that only adds to the confusion: the proliferation of various technologies to address the need to get some of these new kinds of data into an organization’s analytic environment.  What does this mean for your technology environment intended to support your organization’s data discovery, analysis, and reporting needs?

A picture’s worth a thousand words, so let me use Performance Architects’ very own business analytics architectural stack to illustrate how quickly – and how much – the business analytics architecture has had to evolve to address the big data revolution.

This view of a “recommended” business analytics environment from 2012 shows an architecture familiar to any of us who have participated in business analytics initiatives in our organizations over the past several years:

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Now look at the same chart, updated in 2015:

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See any differences (hint: everything in purple)?  This is where I arrive at my five recommendations for how to evolve your business analytics environment to address the big data revolution!

Recommendation #1. Consider all data in your organization to have equal importance (until proven otherwise).

This mind shift is the most important element you’re personally going to need to make, and that you’ll need to socialize with your colleagues, if you’re going to actually implement anything “big data” in your organization.

Transactional or more structured data is what we’re used to dealing with in our work today.  This is the data you have to cleanse for reporting and/or regulatory reasons…and it’s always historical.  Examples include financial data in your general ledger (GL) and customer data in your customer resource management (CRM) system.  The issue is that the BI and EPM software categories grew up to analyze just transactional data, because frankly that’s all organizations were collecting in a digital, analyzable format 10+ years ago!  Most other data sets were considered “garbage” because they were too “dirty” (aka: disorganized) or too difficult to access and store.

“All other data” outside of transactions is where big data mostly comes into play (although there are rightfully organizations that collect such massive amounts of transactional data that it can be considered “big data”…but that’s a topic for another blog post).  I bucket this information in two categories: 1. Unstructured data (really raw data streams that aren’t created to be “officially” analyzed, such as personal documents or videos, etc.) and 2. Semi-structured data (machine and sensor data gathered in large quantities that often need to be analyzed at almost near-real-time speed).

Notice anything about these buckets of data?  This content has the power help you to influence the outcomes of the transactional data before it becomes a historical fact!

Think about the possibilities.  What if your executive team could use a search engine to determine the sentiment of each sales and customer service team about prospective and current customers with deals in the pipeline for that quarter, allowing leadership to intervene if the team’s consensus is that a deal is going sour?  How about mining files on a student or an employee to see trends in behavior that predict an important outcome, such as quitting school or work as a result of financial or familial pressures?

Now do you start to see why all data matters until proven otherwise?

Recommendation #2. Stop thinking you need to know the answer before you analyze the data (look for correlations first).

Many of us think we need to design a business analytics environment from the “top down,” meaning we need to understand what information we want to glean from the data in order to set up the environment.  That’s why most BI + EPM or business analytics projects follow a predictable “waterfall” implementation path:

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I recommend you shift your methodology to add a step in advance of your traditional project activities to address big data:

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The “Discover Correlations” step means rather than assuming causation based on statistical analysis of your historical data, you can implement a variety of solutions on top of all of your data (because, remember, all data is important until proven otherwise!) to understand possible correlations between variables that you’ll then want to analyze further in your business analytics environment to make sure you’re focused on changing outcomes by influencing the behavior that causes these outcomes.  This gets us to Recommendation #3…

Recommendation #3.  Implement data storage and integration technologies that allow some kinds of data to remain “messy” (everything does not need to be stored in a database).

I already discussed the three “V’s.”  The biggest issue right now with current technologies in place in most organizations is the variety of data, meaning that data is coming in a variety of formats that traditional BI and EPM solutions can’t handle.  You need to make sure that your organization looks into and evaluates technologies such as Hadoop and NoSQL to access content that isn’t stored and retrieved using methods common to database technologies.  Some of the larger and/or more thought-leading technology vendors are now starting to come up with technologies to unify these different storage methods, such as Cloudera’s Impala, IBM’s Big SQL, and Oracle’s Big Data SQL.

Recommendation #4.  Make sure key terms are defined and measureable.

Get away from discussing “one version of the truth.”  Instead, focus on knowing your data and data sources, and then making sure that your team agrees on how the data is defined depending on how it is used inside your organization. For example, a “region” may mean different things to your sales, customer service and legal teams…but they are all equally important and valid definitions for the organization.  These definitions can be housed in something as simple as an internal Wiki or a high-powered master data management (MDM) solution.

And, of course, the first definition you need to get straightened out is…big data.

Recommendation #5.  Evolve information delivery to meet current lifestyles.

Okay, answer truthfully here.  Have you pulled over to the side of the road to send a note or report from your phone because your boss wants a real-time update on how your team’s performance is proceeding against plan?  Have you attended one of your kid’s sporting events but spent the whole game in frustration trying to access an important report that crashes on your phone?  Have you snuck away secretly at a reception, play, or movie to check work emails and attachments?

Let’s be honest…sure you have.  We all have.  And that’s the point.  Our work lives are evolving to overlap with personal time, and are allowing us more freedom to do what we want, when we want, as long as we can access the information we need to do our jobs!

So rather than rely on traditional BI solutions that were designed when everyone had desktop or very heavy laptop computers, architect a reporting and analysis environment to address the modern worker’s needs.  This means mobile-friendly solutions that are thin (or no) client; that can be consumed “on the fly;” and that are useful with little to no instruction (think Amazon or Facebook user interface design).

If you’d like help thinking through alternatives, or if you want to learn more about how Performance Architects can help in this arena, please fill in the contact form here and we will follow up with you: as soon as possible!

Author: Kirby Lunger, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How to Install Oracle EPM (Hyperion): Installing FDMEE (Bonus Post of Four-Part Series)

February 11, 2015

To say that I am a big fan of Oracle Hyperion Financial Data Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) would be an understatement. After a couple of blog posts and multiple implementations, I’ve become mildly obsessed. I want to teach you how to use the product because FDMEE is the go-forward application for on premise Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) solutions data management, as well as the data management option for Oracle Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS) (the software-as-a-service version of Oracle Hyperion Planning).  The four blog posts related to this subject include:

  • Part 1.  Covers the download and assembly of the installation folder, as well as the creation of required product schemas.
  • Part 2.  Reviews the installation of Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.
  • Part 3.  Outlines the configuration process.
  • Part 4.  Shows how to install the 11.1.2.3.500 patches for both Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.

This is the first blog post, of many, about how to use the FDMEE solution. In order to follow along, you need to have a local installation of the tool. To do so, I am expecting that you have an existing environment locally installed; if not, I’ve created a blog series on how to locally install Oracle Essbase and Oracle Hyperion Planning to help you get started.

One important note: this installation is on a Windows Server 2008R2 machine.

1. First, access your local Oracle database instance and create a separate table space (make sure to set it to “No Logging”).

2. Second, run the following script to create an FDMEE user.

  • CREATE USER EPM_FDMEE IDENTIFIED BY password
  • DEFAULT TABLESPACE “EPM_FDMEE”
  • QUOTA UNLIMITED ON “EPM_FDMEE”; 
  • GRANT CREATE ANY CLUSTER TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY INDEXTYPE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY PROCEDURE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY SEQUENCE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY SYNONYM TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE SESSION TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE TABLE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE TRIGGER TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE TYPE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE VIEW TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT DROP ANY SYNONYM TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT UNLIMITED TABLESPACE TO EPM_FDMEE;

3. Start up the Oracle installer. If you don’t have one created, look to my previous blog posts to get started. Once up and running, click “Next.”

4. Select to install into the directory previously used by your EPM instance if expanding out an environment (like I am here).

5. Perform a new installation.

6. Uncheck all and then select “FDM Enterprise Edition” from the product components list. The database clients will autoselect along with the “HFM ADM” driver.

7. Note that Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) will install automatically!

8. Once the installation is complete, click “Configure” to launch the Configurator. When the Configurator launches, confirm the “Home” directory and EPM Oracle Instance.

9. Choose to configure the “FDMEE Database,” and deploy it to the application server. You can choose to uncheck “Configure DCOM” if you do not have an installation of Hyperion Financial Management (HFM).

10. Utilize the schema created earlier for the database user for this configuration.

11. Deploy to your existing WebLogic domain.

12. Deploy to a separate server.

13. Confirm the configuration.

14. Allow the configuration to run.

15. Once configuration is complete, FDMEE is set up.

16. Depending on your instance version, you may need to patch FDMEE up to a newer release than the base 11.1.2.3 version.

Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Oracle EPM (Hyperion) Version 11.1.2.4 Launch: Oracle Hyperion Financial Management (HFM) Profile Editor

February 10, 2015

Oracle Hyperion Financial Management (HFM) was re-launched as a multi-platform product in the recent Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) Version 11.1.2.4 release.  One of the long-awaited enhancements in this release is the creation of application profiles.

Application profiles define the core characteristics of an HFM application, such as the languages and calendar it uses, as well as custom dimensions (since Version 11.1.2.3). However, until 11.1.2.4, application profiles required the administrator to install the HFM Desktop client. Version 11.1.2.4 introduces the “Profile Editor,” which provides an online means to create said profile, without needing the HFM Desktop client.

The Profile Editor is accessed from the “Consolidation Administration” menu item in EPM Workspace. Double-click on the “Profile Editor” item in the “Admin Tasks” menu on the left to launch the editor.

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The administrator is then presented with the option of creating a new profile or selecting an existing profile. Selecting an existing profile allows the import of profile files created in previous versions of HFM, and upgrades automatically.

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The rest of the steps to create a profile are the same as before, including creating languages;

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Defining the calendar;

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Setting up data frequencies;

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Defining calendar periods; and

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Adding custom dimensions.

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Once complete, the administrator has the option of saving the profile to file as XML or binary.

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The administrator can also use it to immediately create a new application.

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Stay tuned for more posts where we explore additional enhancements introduced in Oracle EPM 11.1.2.4.

Author: Andy Tauro, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Oracle EPM (Hyperion) Version 11.1.2.4 Launch: Interface Enhancements

February 9, 2015

As you may have heard, Oracle just released Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) Version 11.1.2.4. You may say, “Big deal, don’t they come out with a new release at least every year?” Actually, this happens to be the first new major release in two calendar years. In calendar year 2014, we saw the release of Patch Set Update (PSU) 500 for Version 11.1.2.3. Yes, it came with enhanced functionality, kind of like how Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) made Windows incredibly more usable!

So what’s the “big deal” with this version? Quite a bit, I must say. Did you hear that Hyperion Financial Management (HFM) can now run on Linux and on Exalytics?…or that Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) now has a data synchronization feature to move data between Oracle EPM applications, like HFM to Essbase?…or lots of other enhancements that we will be talking about in posts in the near future.

For now, I want to bring your attention to the updated interface. As soon as you get to the log-in page, you will notice the new colors. The “install-on-your-own-hardware version” (on premise version) of Oracle EPM now uses the Oracle cloud colors (Oracle’s first cloud offering in the Oracle EPM area is Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service or PBCS, which is a software-as-a-service version of Hyperion Planning).

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Once you log in to the application, the new colors are everywhere. Is it just me, or does the interface seem faster, slicker and more responsive?

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The updated interface extends to the application as well. Here we see the new colors in Hyperion Planning. We will explore the interface updates to other products in a bit more detail in following posts.

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I could talk about it forever, but that would keep me from highlighting the new interface for Hyperion Planning. The simplified interface has been expanded to include functionality for Hyperion Planning application administrators.

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The “Jobs” interface that was recently introduced in PBCS is now available in the on premise 11.1.2.4 version.

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We will talk about other enhancements in more detail soon. Meanwhile, if you want to get a jump on these improvements and learn more about the details, feel free to send us a note, at communications@performancearchitects.com. We can show you the new interface and help determine how you can roll it this to your team.

Author: Andy Tauro, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How to Install Oracle EPM (Hyperion): Patching Oracle EPM (Part 4 of Four-Part Series)

February 4, 2015

Welcome to Part 4 of a four-part series detailing the installation, configuration, and patching process for a basic Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) 11.1.2.3 environment containing both Oracle Essbase and Hyperion Planning. The four blog posts related to this subject include:

  • Part 1.  Covers the download and assembly of the installation folder, as well as the creation of required product schemas.
  • Part 2.  Reviews the installation of Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.
  • Part 3.  Outlines the configuration process.
  • Part 4.  Shows how to install the 11.1.2.3.500 patches for both Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.

This post focuses on the patching process, along with instructions on how to tune some of the Java heap sizes to better manage system resources on a smaller local machine. At this point, you should have a local machine instance of EPM installed and configured. In addition, you should have downloaded the patch set from Oracle E-Delivery. As part of this process, you will also download several additional Essbase patches from Oracle Support.

1. To begin, you first need to download a few patches from Oracle Support. First, navigate to support.oracle.com

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2. Sign in with your Oracle ID. Once logged in, select “Patches & Updates” from the menu page.

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3. Download the following series of patches from Oracle Support, by entering both the patch number and the operating system.

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4. These patches can be downloaded into the “C:\oracle_install_files folder”  The patches include:

  • p17767307_11123000_MSWIN-x86-64
  • p17767302_11123000_MSWIN-x86-64
  • p17767299_11123000_MSWIN-x86-64
  • p17767309_11123000_MSWIN-x86-64

5. You first need to unzip the patches into the “Oracle Middleware OPatch” directory. Locate the files in the “C:\oracle_install_files” directory.

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6. Right-click, and unzip the file into the “C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1\OPatch” directory.

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7. After the file is extracted, you will see the following in the “OPatch” directory.

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8. Continue to extract all of the patches into the “OPatch” directory.

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9. With all of the patches extracted, it is time to apply them using the command line utility. Open up a “Command Line” session, making sure to select “Run as Adminstrator.”

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10. First, change the directory to the “OPatch” folder by using the following command:

“cd C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1\OPatch.”

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11. At this point, you can now apply a patch. Apply the first patch using the following command: “opatch.bat apply 17529887_WIN64 –oh C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1 –jre C:\Oracle\Middleware\jdk160_35.”

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12. Once the patch executes, look for a “Success” message.

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13. Once you apply this patch, apply the remaining patches. The commands required are noted below:

  • opatch.bat apply 17767299 -oh C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1 -jre C:\Oracle\Middleware\jdk160_35
  • opatch.bat apply 17767302 -oh C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1 -jre C:\Oracle\Middleware\jdk160_35
  • opatch.bat apply 17767309 -oh C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1 -jre C:\Oracle\Middleware\jdk160_35

14. After all of the patches are applied, run the following command to confirm. You should see each of the applied patches listed: “opatch.bat lsinventory –oh C:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1.”

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15. With these patches applied, navigate back to the “OPatch” directory using the Windows Explorer.

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16. Run the “EssbaseClient.exe” as an administrator.

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17. With the installer launched, click “Next.”

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18. Once the installer finishes, click “Finish” to close.

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19. The patches process is now complete. You’re almost done!

20. Since this installation focuses on a personal laptop or desktop with limited resources, you’ll need to tune the Java applications.

21. Navigate to the following directory: “C:\Oracle\Middleware\user_projects\epmsystem1\bin\deploymentScripts.”

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22. This directory contains the deployment scripts for each of the products that offer a Java web application. The out-of-the-box settings for the Java Heap allow for significant growth, which may not be possible on a smaller machine. I recommend reducing the upper-limit of the heap setting to establish consistent performance on your machine.

23. Open the “setCustomParamsAnalyticProviderServices.bat” file in a text editor. I am using Notepad++, a free text editor.

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24. Change the upper limit (maximum size) from “Xmx4096m” down to a more reasonable “512m.”

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25. Save the text file, and from there continue to edit the remaining files. Set each upper limit to 512m.

26. One this is complete, you can finally switch from a cup of coffee, to a cup of something a little stronger! In my case, a glass of red wine…

27. Now you can start services!  Open the “Start” menu, and navigate to “Oracle EPM System.”  From there, navigate to the “epmsystem1 Foundation Services”. Finally, run the “Start EPM System” script.

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28. Services will begin to start.

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29. Once services restart, we can access the “Workspace” URL. Replace “#comptuer# name” with your local machine name.

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30. Horah! Login with your username & password.

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31. With your new instance up and running, check the remaining products.  Access “Planning Administration” to check Planning (Navigate –> Administer –> Planning Administration).

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32. Open up “Calculation Manager” (Navigate –> Administer – > Calculation Manager).

33. Access “Web Launcher” for “Essbase Administration Services. “

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34. Log in to EAS. Once logged in, right-click on “Essbase Servers “and” Add Essbase Server.”   Add the default values.

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35. You now have a functioning environment that offers the opportunity to now build Essbase applications, deploy Planning apps, and – if you want – expand your environment.

Please post questions and comments below! Thanks!

Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How to Install Oracle EPM (Hyperion): Configuring Oracle EPM (Part 3 of Four-Part Series)

February 4, 2015

Welcome to Part 3 of a four-part series detailing the installation, configuration, and patching process for a basic Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) environment containing both Oracle Essbase and Oracle Hyperion Planning. The four blog posts related to this subject include:

  • Part 1.  Covers the download and assembly of the installation folder, as well as the creation of required product schemas.
  • Part 2.  Reviews the installation of Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.
  • Part 3.  Outlines the configuration process.
  • Part 4.  Shows how to install the 11.1.2.3.500 patches for both Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.

This post focuses on the configuration process. The configuration process deploys all of the Java web applications; registers all of the various products with the Shared Services instance; creates database objects in each schema; and creates the HTTP server. Essentially, we are transitioning installed software to a functioning environment.

Note: Prior to beginning the configuration process, check to make sure that the local database instance is up and running. If you have not created the required schemas, you can find the scripts here.

1. To begin, start the EPM System Configurator by right-clicking, and then select “Run as Administrator.” The EPM System Configurator can be found here:

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2. After the EPM System Configurator launches, you will first need to specify the “Middleware” home directory, as well as an instance name. I’ve elected to use the base directories specified automatically by the Configurator. Click “Next.”

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3. From here, you’ll need to connect to a local database instance, specifically for Shared Services.

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4. Enter in the connection information for your database. For Shared Services, you will need to use the EPM_HSS user created during Part 1 of this blog series.

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5. The Configurator will try to connect to the database and verify the connection.

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6. Once the connection is successfully verified to the database, you will be able to select the available installed products for configuration.

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7. Expand out the list so that you can see the following products available for configuration. You should configure all of these products, so accept the defaults and click “Next.”

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8. Use the default values when configuring the common settings, as you’ll need services created for each of the products. You won’t be configuring a mail server. The “LCM Export/Import” folder can be changed if required (I typically choose the default location).

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9. By default, the “Configure Database” screen sets the database schema for all products to the one specified during the Shared Services set up.

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10. We will be configuring the installation across multiple schemas. Uncheck each of the individual products. Once this is complete, change each user name and password to the cooresponding schemas created during Part 1 of this guide. Click “Next.”

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11. Once the connections have been verified to the database schemas, individual application settings can be configured. Accept the defaults for “Reporting and Analysis.”

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12. At this point, you need to specify the domain and credentials for the WebLogic domain created during the configuration.

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13. Specify a password and note it down. The password should be eight characters long.  Click “Next.”

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14. By default, the applications are deployed to a single managed server.

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15. Uncheck the box “Deploy the Java web application to a single managed server”. Click “Next.”

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16. At this point, it is time to configure the Essbase Server. Accept the default values.

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17. Similarly, accept the default values for the “Reporting and Analysis Framework Agent Ports.”

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18. Accept the default value for the “Planning RMI Port.”

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19. The Configurator then configures the Web Server. Accept the default values.

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20. At this point, the Configurator registers and initiates the Oracle Configuration Manager. Uncheck the box labelled “I wish to receive security updates via My Oracle Support”. Click “Next.”

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21. Acknowledge the warning and click “Yes.”

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22. Specify a Shared Services password and click “Next.”

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23. All of the configuration tasks should be listed on the following screen:

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24. The configuration begins when you click “Next.”

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25. Once the configuration is complete, review the results/status.

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26. With everything successfully configured, click “Finish.”

27. Congratulations!  The installation is now complete!  A variety of new services now exist in the “Services” menu. To access Services, type “services.msc” into the “Start” bar.

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28. To better manage the local system as well as system resources, change the Oracle services “Startup Type” from Automatic to Manual. To do so, right-click on a service and select “Properties.” Change “Startup Type” to “Manual.”

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29. Setting the services to manual startup requires them to be managed via the Start/Stop scripts.

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30 Finally, disable “Oraclec_oracle_middle~1_epmsys~1c_oracle_middleware_user_projects_epmsystem1ConfigurationManager.” service.

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At this point, the configuration is largely complete, and services could be started. However, as this install is base Version 11.1.2.3, I would consider taking the time to patch to the latest version. See Part 4 for a guide on post-configuration steps coming up next week!

Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How to Install Oracle EPM (Hyperion): Installing Oracle EPM (Part 2 of Four-Part Series)

February 4, 2015

Welcome to Part 2 of a four-part series detailing the installation, configuration, and patching process for a basic Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) environment containing both Oracle Essbase and Oracle Hyperion Planning.

The four blog posts related to this subject include:

  • Part 1.  Covers the download and assembly of the installation folder, as well as the creation of required product schemas.
  • Part 2.  Reviews the installation of Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.
  • Part 3.  Outlines the configuration process.
  • Part 4.  Shows how to install the 11.1.2.3.500 patches for both Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.

Feel free to read Part 1 to catch up!

After prepping your local machine, downloading assemblies, and creating the installation folder, you can begin the installation process – which is fairly straightforward!

1. With the installation folder prepped, you can go ahead and launch the installer. Find the file called “installTool.cmd” located in the C:\oracle_installer directory. Right click, and run as administrator.

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2. Choose a language and click OK.

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3. The installer will review several prerequisites, and note any issues at the bottom. As demonstrated below, the system passes validation. Resolve any errors before continuing. Click “Next.”

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4.Select a location for the installation. I am using the default location specified (C:\Oracle\Middleware).

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5. Elect to perform a new installation.

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6. From here you can see a list of all the available products for installation. Since the assemblies containt the required files for other products such as Financial Data Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE), Hyperion Strategic Finance (HSF), and Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management (HPCM), they are listed as available for install.

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7. Click Uncheck All. This clears all of the available products, providing an empty list to choose from.

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8. Check the following products:

  • Under Foundation Services:All Foundation Components
    Calculation Manager
  • Under Essbase:Essbase Administration Services Web Application
    Provider Services Java Web Application
    Essbase Server
    Essbase Server Samples
  • Under Reporting and Analysis:Framework (which contains Framework Java Web Application
    Framework Services and Common Libraries
  • Under Planning: Planning Java Web Application

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9. At this point, you have an opportunity to review the EPM install. Each product is listed for installation:

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10. Click “Next” to move on to the installation.

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11. As each product is installed, a check mark will appear next to the product.

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12. Almost there!

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13. Once the installation is complete, you can either choose the “Configure the EPM System” option or the “Finish” option.

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14. Click “Finish.”

15. Reviewing the C:\Oracle\Middleware folder you can see that the base installation deployed a variety of capabilities including the Common Middleware Framework, as well as the System 11 EPM files.

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16. With the installation complete, you can move on to the configuration process, which is covered in the next blog in this series.

Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How to Install Oracle EPM (Hyperion): Preparing for an Install (Part 1 of Four-Part Series)

February 4, 2015

Welcome to Part 1 of a four-part series on a basic install of Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) 11.1.2.3! This series covers the installation of Oracle Essbase and Oracle Hyperion Planning on a single Windows Server 2008 R2 machine. The goal is to (hopefully!) help you to stand up your own local install for development and learning purposes, with minimal fuss.

Unlike the standard and rapid deployment guides from Oracle, this guide forces you to configure the applications across several different schemas and individual WebLogic application servers. This helps replicate the standard Performance Architects installation, which provides clear visibility into the database structure for each application. This also allows you to recover an individual product from a backup if something goes wrong, or to easily start over!

The four blog posts related to this subject include:

  • Part 1.  Covers the download and assembly of the installation folder, as well as the creation of required product schemas.
  • Part 2.  Reviews the installation of Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.
  • Part 3.  Outlines the configuration process.
  • Part 4.  Shows how to install the 11.1.2.3.500 patches for both Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase. 

A few assumptions you’ll need to take into account before you start:

  • Your machine that handles your instance of EPM is up and running.
  • You have access to the Oracle E-Delivery and Oracle Support web sites.
  • You are installing on an Oracle Database (for which I’ve provided the “Create User” scripts). If you are installing on SQL Server, then you will have to create each database individually. If you do not have a database installed, follow this quick guide that shows you how to install your own instance of Oracle 11g! http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/10/oracle-11g-step-by-step-installation-guide-with-screenshots/
  • You are comfortable asking questions if you need answers!

Without much further ado, let’s go ahead and get started. The rest of this post covers the steps required to prepare for an install: specifically, getting your local machine ready, downloading the prerequisite installation files, and creating the installation folder.

1. Take a brief read over the following document: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E40248_01/epm.1112/epm_standard_deploy.pdf. This contains some information regarding minimum hardware specifications.  I would suggest installing in an environment that has at least 4CPUs and 12GB of RAM. This is debatable, so feel free to comment if you think differently.

2. Check to make sure that you have administrative privileges for the machine you are installing on. If you don’t know, or don’t know how to check, see the following link: http://www.technipages.com/how-to-check-for-administrator-rights

3. Disable “User Access Control” by clicking “Start” and then typing “UAC”. Select “Change User Account Control settings”.

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4. Set the level to “Never Notify” and click “OK.”

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5. Download the relevant assemblies from the Oracle E-Delivery site. This includes the installation documentation.

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6. Log in with your Oracle ID by clicking “Sign In / Register”

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7. Read the “Terms & Restrictions,” and if so inclined, agree to them to move forward. Pay particular attention to the following clause: You agree that neither the programs nor any direct product thereof will be exported, directly, or indirectly, in violation of these laws, or will be used for any purpose prohibited by these laws including, without limitation, nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons proliferation.”

8. Select “Oracle Enterprise Performance Management System” from the first drop down. Select the appropriate platform for the second drop down. For this installation, I have selected “Microsoft Windows x64 (64-bit)”. Click “Go.”

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9. Select the “11.1.2.3 Download” option and click “Continue.”

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10. From here, you need to select the appropriate files for download. I have listed them below. When you download these files, put them in the following directory: C:\oracle_install_files.

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Assemblies to download:

  • V46965-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 Installation Documents and Readmes
  • V45339-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Part 1
  • V37945-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Part 2
  • V37933-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 Part 3
  • V37946-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Part 4
  • V45341-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Part 5
  • V37948-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Part 6
  • V37949-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Part 7
  • V37950-01: EPM System Release 11.1.2.3.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) Oracle HTTP Server
  • V44215-01: EPM System Patchset Release 11.1.2.3.500 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit)

11. While all these assemblies are downloading, you need to create the required database schemas.

12. Log in as a user with SYS rights to your Oracle instance.

13. Execute the create user statements to create all of the users you need for the install. If you don’t know how to create the EPM_TABLESPACE or you need to access the create user statements, please send me a note requesting access. The users are:

  • EPM_HSS
  • EPM_RA
  • EPM_CALC
  • EPM_PLAN
  • EPM_PLAP1
  • EPM_EAS
  • EPM_ODS (consider this a hint to a later surprise!)

The minimum privileges include:

  • CREATE ANY SYNONYM
  • CREATE CLUSTER
  • CREATE INDEXTYPE
  • CREATE PROCEDURE
  • CREATE SEQUENCE
  • CREATE SESSION
  • CREATE TABLE
  • CREATE TRIGGER
  • CREATE TYPE
  • CREATE VIEW
  • DROP ANY SYNONYM
  • UNLIMITED TABLESPACE

14. Once you have executed the scripts, you should see the various schemas listed in Toad (or SQL Developer).

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15. While those assemblies continue to download, grab a cup of coffee!

16. Once all of the assemblies are downloaded, you should have a folder that looks something like this:

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17. Now it is time to unzip all of these files into the same directory, to create the Installation folder. Create a folder on your local drive called C:\oracle_installer. Once this is done, unzip the first file into this directory:

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18. After this first extract is complete, the installation folder will look like this:

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19. Continue to unzip all of the assemblies into this directory. You do not need to unzip V44215-01.zip into this directory.

20. Once complete, the directory should look as follows:

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With this complete you now have an installation folder ready to go! At this point, refill the coffee cup, and take a breather. From here it is time to install the products! Stay tuned for Part 2 of this installation series for next steps.

Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects


© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.